America has Record Year for Renewables, with California ranked Top Clean Tech State

California has topped a new Index rating America’s states and cities according to their clean tech leadership. The report also reveals that the nation generated a record-breaking share of electricity from renewable energy sources in 2012.

The US Clean Tech Leadership Index by researchers Clean Edge, shows that renewables accounted for 49% of America’s added electricity capacity in 2012 — its largest ever share.

STATE LEADERSHIP

To uncover which states contributed the most to this feat, the report ranks America’s states by almost 70 factors under three categories: capital, technology and policy.

California came first for its large-scale clean electricity and energy efficiency deployment as well as its innovative policies. For example in 2012, California launched America’s first auction of carbon credits and also became the first state to install more than one gigawatt of solar PV generating capacity.

Completing the top ten is Massachusetts, Oregon, New York, Colorado, Washington, New Mexico, Illinois, Minnesota and Hawaii.

TOP CITIES

Five Californian cities also ranked highly in the Metro Index part of the report, where the country’s 50 largest cities are rated on 20 factors across four categories: green buildings, advanced transportation, clean electricity and carbon management and clean tech investment, innovation and workforce.

The top ten cities for clean tech leadership are:

San Francisco, CA
San Jose, CA
Portland, OR
Los Angeles, CA
Washington, DC
Sacramento, CA
San Diego, CA
Denver, CO
Seattle, WA
Boston, MA
SUB-NATIONAL PROGRESS

The report marks the first time the research firm has released the Index results publically. Ron Pernick, managing director, Clean Edge said of the report findings: “Clean-tech deployment in the US is largely being driven by state and metro-level activity. And it’s no longer about small, barely visible slices of market share.”

Clint Wilder, senior editor, Clean Edge added: “Some states and cities now compete with entire nations for clean-tech leadership. Iowa, for example – ranked #6 in the State Index’s Technology category – now generates more electricity from wind than the international powerhouse Denmark.”

Amy Davidsen, US Executive Director, The Climate Group said: “While progress at the federal level is stalled, cities and states are moving ahead to develop a competitive advantage in numerous emerging clean tech sectors. This leadership at the sub-national level will continue to play a critical role in the overall US response to climate change in the years to come.”

Source: The Climate Group

For more information on: The Climate Group